Lunchtime Teaching Workshops

The Bok Center invites you to join us for a series of lunchtime teaching workshops geared toward answering questions and tackling challenges you might encounter as a TF at Harvard.  Each meeting will be a combination of interactive instruction and group discussion, allowing TFs to nuance their thinking about teaching while also troubleshooting particular issues they've encountered in the classroom.  The sessions are designed to be interdisciplinary and reach out to TFs across departments.  Lunch will be provided.  Please RSVP to provide the Bok Center with an approximate headcount.

Making the First Section Count: Tips and Tricks
Graduate students, postdocs and other affiliates are welcome to attend.
Friday, 9 September
12:00-1:30
The Bok Community Space, Science Center Room 318

Using Early Feedback to Fine-tune Your Teaching
Graduate students, postdocs and other affiliates are welcome to attend.
Tuesday, 27 September
12:00-1:30
The Bok Community Space, Science Center Room 318

Efficiently Giving Feedback Students Will Use
Graduate students, postdocs and other affiliates are welcome to attend.
Tuesday, 11 October
12:00-1:30
The Bok Community Space, Science Center Room 318

Grading can be incredibly time-consuming, and it's important to develop strategies for containing the time you spend grading--while still providing meaningful feedback to your students. In this workshop we'll work together to raise and debunk some of the most common misconceptions about responding to student work, and then we'll model the most important principles of effective--and more efficient--feedback. Lunch will be provided.

Register here.

Time Management Workshop
Graduate students, postdocs and other affiliates are welcome to attend.
Monday, 7 November
12:00-1:30
The Bok Community Space, Science Center Room 318

Trying to figure out how to balance research and teaching? At this session, we'll discuss strategies for managing time in graduate school. Graduate students and Bok Center staff will share insights on finding a working balance between the many competing responsibilities graduate students face-- from teaching, to research, to family life. Participants will do some practical exercises to determine their priorities and come away with useful tips for finding their optimal work/life balance. Lunch will be provided.

Register here.

-------

Lunches in the 2015-16 academic year covered the following topics, among others:

Dealing with Grade-Obsessed Students

Harvard is a high­stakes environment, and for some undergraduates every grade in the semester counts. In this workshop, we will detail effective strategies for setting clear grading standards, explaining those standards to course participants, and navigating confrontations with dissatisfied students. We'll also discuss some of the reasons why undergraduates can seem grade-obsessed, and how to manage their expectations when it comes to assessment.  Departmental Teaching Fellows from STEM and the Humanities/Social Sciences will move through a number of familiar scenarios with Harvard undergraduates who will offer a student perspective on this issue, while also giving workshop participants the chance to try their own hand at responding to grade-related disappointment.

How to Motivate Students

Confused why students aren’t doing the reading? Stymied by lack of participation in section? The answer to your woes may lie in student motivation. In this workshop we will examine how student motivation (or lack thereof) impacts participation and learning. Directed at TFs with undergraduate sections, this workshop will build a framework for understanding what motivates students, and how that translates to performance in the classroom. It will explore concrete and practical strategies for encouraging student participation, so that the next time your questions about this week's reading are met with blank stares, you will know what to do!

Giving Thoughtful Feedback Through Writing

In this session, led by a Preceptor in Expository Writing and the Departmental Teaching Fellow for Government, we’ll discuss best practices for responding to student writing. We’ll address questions including: How can you write the most effective and efficient margin and end comments? How can you help students with a wide range of writing problems? And how can your responses engage students as writers and thinkers?